Search for resonant top quark pair production in proton-proton collisions at √s= 13 TeV

A search for a heavy resonance decaying into a top quark and antiquark (tt¯) pair is performed using proton-proton collisions at √s= 13 TeV. The search uses the data set collected with the CMS detector in 2016, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb1. The analysis considers three exclusive final states and uses reconstruction techniques that are optimized for top quarks with high Lorentz boosts, which requires the use of non isolated leptons and jet substructure techniques. No significant excess of events relative to the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. Upper limits on the production cross section of heavy resonances decaying to a tt¯ pair are calculated. Limits are derived for a leptophobic topcolor Z’ resonance with widths of 1, 10, and 30%, relative to the mass of the resonance, and exclude masses up to 3.80, 5.25, and 6.65 TeV, respectively. Kaluza-Klein excitations of the gluon in the Randall-Sundrum model are excluded up to 4.55 TeV. To date, these are the most stringent limits on top quark pair resonances.

Search for new physics in dijet angular distributions using proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV and constraints on dark matter and other models

A search is presented for physics beyond the standard model, based on measurements of dijet angular distributions in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)= 13 TeV. The data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC correspond to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb1. The observed distributions are found to be in agreement with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics that include electroweak corrections. Constraints are placed on models containing quark contact interactions, extra spatial dimensions, quantum black holes, or dark matter using the detector-level distributions. In a benchmark model where only left-handed quarks participate, contact interactions are excluded at the 95% confidence level up to a scale of 12.8 or 17.5 TeV, for destructive or constructive interference, respectively. The most stringent lower limits to date are set on the ultraviolet cutoff in the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali model of extra dimensions. In the Giudice-Rattazzi-Wells convention, the cutoff scale is excluded up to 10.1 TeV. The production of quantum black holes is excluded for masses below 5.9 and 8.2 TeV, depending on the model. For the first time, lower limits between 2.0 and 4.6 TeV are set on the mass of a dark matter mediator for (axial-)vector mediators, for the universal quark coupling gq 1.

Search for narrow resonances in the b-tagged dijet mass spectrum in proton-proton collisions at √s= 8 TeV

A search for narrow resonances decaying to bottom quark-antiquark pairs is presented, using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at √s= 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb1. The search is extended to masses lower than those reached in typical searches for resonances decaying into jet pairs at the LHC, by taking advantage of triggers that identify jets originating from bottom quarks. No significant excess of events is observed above the background predictions. Limits are set on the product of cross section and branching fraction to bottom quarks for spin 0, 1, and 2 resonances in the mass range of 325-1200 GeV. These results significantly improve on the limits for resonances decaying into jet pairs in the 325-500 GeV mass range.

Search for supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV using identified top quarks

A search for supersymmetry is presented based on proton-proton collision events containing identified hadronically decaying top quarks, no leptons, and an imbalance pmissT in transverse momentum. The data were collected with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb1. Search regions are defined in terms of the multiplicity of bottom quark jet and top quark candidates, the pmissT, the scalar sum of jet transverse momenta, and the mT2 mass variable. No statistically significant excess of events is observed relative to the expectation from the standard model. Lower limits on the masses of supersymmetric particles are determined at 95% confidence level in the context of simplified models with top quark production. For a model with direct top squark pair production followed by the decay of each top squark to a top quark and a neutralino, top squark masses up to 1020 GeV and neutralino masses up to 430 GeV are excluded. For a model with pair production of gluinos followed by the decay of each gluino to a top quark-antiquark pair and a neutralino, gluino masses up to 2040 GeV and neutralino masses up to 1150 GeV are excluded. These limits extend previous results.

The Phase-2 Upgrade of the CMS Level-1 Trigger

This Interim Report briefly documents the current and planned research and development that will lead to the Phase-2 upgrade of the CMS Level-1 (L1) trigger. As such, this document represents a roadmap to the preparation of a future Technical Design Report (TDR). Taking full advantage of advances in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and optical link technologies as well as their maturation expected over the coming years, the TDR for the Phase-2 upgrade of the CMS L1 trigger is scheduled to be delivered in approximately two years from the time of this writing. The purpose of this document is thus to complement the detector TDRs and to provide an updated cost estimate.

Fast inference of deep neural networks in FPGAs for particle physics.

Recent results at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have pointed to enhanced physics capabilities through the improvement of the real-time event processing techniques. Machine learning methods are ubiquitous and have proven to be very powerful in LHC physics, and particle physics as a whole. However, exploration of the use of such techniques in low-latency, low-power FPGA hardware has only just begun. FPGA-based trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) systems have extremely low, sub-microsecond latency requirements that are unique to particle physics. We present a case study for neural network inference in FPGAs focusing on a classifier for jet substructure which would enable, among many other physics scenarios, searches for new dark sector particles and novel measurements of the Higgs boson. While we focus on a specific example, the lessons are far-reaching. We develop a package based on High-Level Synthesis (HLS) called hls4ml to build machine learning models in FPGAs. The use of HLS increases accessibility across a broad user community and allows for a drastic decrease in firmware development time. We map out FPGA resource usage and latency versus neural network hyperparameters to identify the problems in particle physics that would benefit from performing neural network inference with FPGAs. For our example jet substructure model, we fit well within the available resources of modern FPGAs with a latency on the scale of 100 ns.

Search for new physics with dijet angular distributions in proton-proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV

A search is presented for extra spatial dimensions, quantum black holes, and quark contact interactions in measurements of dijet angular distributions in proton-proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV. The data were collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 2.6 f b1. The distributions are found to be in agreement with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics that include electroweak corrections. Limits for different contact interaction models are obtained. In a benchmark model, valid to next-to-leading order in QCD and in which only left handed quarks participate, quark contact interactions are excluded up to a scale of 11.5 and 14.7 TeV for destructive or constructive interference, respectively. The production of quantum black holes is excluded for masses below 7.8 or 5.3 TeV, depending on the model. The lower limits for the scales of virtual graviton exchange in the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali model of extra spatial dimensions are in the range 7.9–11.2 TeV, and are the most stringent set of limits available.